HomePrevious Nursing Research Residencies

Previous Nursing Research Residencies

2014 Nursing Research Resident

Chin-Hong No, RN, MSN , Kaiser West Los Angeles

During her residency, Chin worked on different ongoing projects while learning to  conduct an integrative review with support from the research department experts.  At  the conclusion of her residency, Chin completed an integrative review examining  verbal de-escalation in the acute care and emergency department setting. She became skilled in the review process of finding, appraising, translating, and synthesizing the evidence in a systematic manner. Chin also learned how to create a poster to facilitate the dissemination of her findings.  Her deliverables were a summary report of the evidence, as well as a poster presentation at the KP SCAL Inaugural Clinical Nursing Conference in November and within her local medical center. The information has been made public for our community partners to use as well as being disseminated amongst executive leaders throughout Kaiser Permanente.  Chin is a role model for staff nurses wishing to expand their competencies and knowledge in order to do the right thing in the right way.

2012 Nursing Research Resident

Jasper C. Diaz, BSN RN WCC

Jasper is currently an ICU Charge Nurse at Kaiser Permanente Moreno Valley Hospital. His experience has been in various fields such as critical care, infusion / home health, education & training, management, and is also Wound Care Certified. At KP Moreno Valley – he has been an active member of the LMP Council, Nursing Quality Board, Nursing Service Committee, Nursing Professional Practice Council, a co-chair of the Nursing Research / Practice Board, and Co-Investigator for the Pressure Ulcer / Skin Study. He was the 2011 Service Ambassador for KP Moreno Valley, and that same year was also chosen as one of the nurses in the Inland Empire to receive from the CA State Senate the Notable Nurse Recognition award.

He is a staunch patient advocate who wants to motivate and inspire his co-workers and other nurses- to get involved in research and evidence-based care to help improve nursing practice.

2011 Nursing Research Resident

Deanna L. Mussell, RN, BSN

Deanna L. Mussell, RN, BSN

Deanna L. Mussell, RN, BSN

Deanna is a charge nurse in the Intensive Care Unit at Kaiser Permanente Woodland Hills.  She started her professional nursing career in the telemetry unit at the Woodland Hills Medical Center in 1998.  She is a member of the local Nursing Practice Council (NPC).  Through the NPC, Deanna has been involved in both evidence based practice projects (Say Aaahhh) and translational research projects.  The NPC is currently conducting a research project that examines enteral feeding practices.  Deanna is a co-investigator for this research project.
During her residency, Deanna will be working on the Unavoidable Pressure Ulcer study.  She is excited to be a part of a large multi-site research study and is looking forward to bringing back valuable information to her local medical center.

 

2011 Nursing Research Resident

Alyssa T. Morita, RN, BA, BSN

Alyssa T. Morita, RN, BA, BSN

Alyssa T. Morita, RN, BA, BSN Staff RN,
Telemetry/Step Down Unit
Kaiser Permanente, West Los Angeles Medical Center

Alyssa began her professional career as a Research Assistant at an Envirotoxicology Medical Center. She started her nursing career in 2007 on the Step-down/Telemetry Unit at Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles Medical Center(KPWLA). Since then, she has served as member of her Unit Based Team and Magnet Committee, in KPWLA’s journey toward Magnet designation.
Alyssa’s goal as the 2009 Nursing Research Resident is to develop a better understanding of nursing research and partake in the systematic process that shapes the way we practice at the bedside. In turn she hopes to translate this understanding and awareness of available resources back to the clinical arena, advocating for increased nursing participation and engagement in research.

2008 Nursing Research Resident

Linda Coy, RN, BSN

Linda Coy, RN, BSN

Linda Coy, RN, BSN
Staff RN, PACU
Ontario Vineyard Ambulatory Center (OVASC)

 

 

 

2007 Nursing Research Residents

Kristin E. Cominski, RN, BS, BSN

Kristin E. Cominski, RN, BS, BSN

Kristin E. Cominski, RN, BS, BSN
Staff RN, Coronary Care Unit
Kaiser Permanente, Los Angeles Medical Center

 

 

 

 

Maryjo R. Pulmano, RN, ADN

Maryjo R. Pulmano, RN, ADN

Maryjo R. Pulmano, RN, ADN
Staff RN, Step Down Unit
Kaiser Permanente, Baldwin Park Medical Center

 

 

 

2006 Nursing Research Residents

Jennifer R. Briseno, RN, BSN

Jennifer R. Briseno, RN, BSN

Jennifer R. Briseno, RN, BSN
Staff RN, Critical Care Unit
Kaiser Permanente, Baldwin Park Medical Center

 

 

 

 

Roque C. Garvida, Jr, RN, MSN

Roque C. Garvida, Jr, RN, MSN

Roque C. Garvida, Jr, RN, MSN
Staff RN, Telemetry Unit
Kaiser Permanente, Panorama City Medical Center

 

 

 

 

2005 Nursing Research Residents

Yvonne Henry

Yvonne Henry

Yvonne Henry

The research residency during the last four months has been a true learning experience. I now understand how a concept for research starts and how change starts with research. The Human Participant Protection Education for Research course was an eye opener into nursing research. This course gave me the background information on research, as well as important principles and guidelines, which I was able to apply to the research application process with the IRB. I now realize how important research is to the nursing community. All things happen because someone had an idea and a plan to make things better!

Joining the Alternatives to Restraints Study allowed me to participate in class inservices, interact with nurses, research files/medical records, and develop technical skills. I learned how to do a literature search on the Internet using many different search engines. I have increased my computer skills by developing a data coding spreadsheet, which enabled me to enter research data. In turn, entering data made me curious about patients and their care. Are restraint alternatives working? Are we using the nursing process? Are we just checking boxes on a form? A patient has been in restraints during her entire hospital stay — why were our processes not effective? What happens when she returns home? I now question why some patients are in restraints at all!

The Nursing Research Committee meetings assisted me in becoming aware of what changes are taking place within different facilities and levels of Kaiser Permanente. I have learned to anticipate how these changes can affect me one day. I worked with a great group of people who kept me focused and allowed me to have fun at work.

June Rondinelli

June Rondinelli

June Rondinelli

During my time in the residency program, I learned that research is a systematic scientific process that must adhere to certain pre-determined standards. Using this process, I am now able to delineate the difference between projects, studies, and quality improvement. I understand the purpose and importance of an institute’s Internal Review Board (IRB) and it’s oversight of research programs. I have become familiar with the Iowa Based Model for Evidence Based Practice as a guide for evidence-based projects. By observing how research studies are conceptualized, I developed an understanding of an in-depth literature review and how research tools are chosen. This new skills enabled me to participate in the Caring Study being conducted at the Anaheim Medical Center and the SoCal CNS Study. The CNS Study allowed me to learn how to separate qualitative data into themes and define these themes, as well as learning to randomize data examples for validation, setting up Excel spreadsheets, and entering data. This study provided an opportunity for me to explore the use of pilot studies and focus groups.

An important component of my experience was networking with advanced practice nurses, which also promoted my own professional growth. I observed how the Woodland Hills NPC promotes evidence based practice with the Nursing FYI Newsletter, as well as updating policies with cited nursing research. West Los Angeles’s commitment to research allowed me to examine the processes of a research committee and research implement as they continue their journey toward Magnet status.

My personal achievements have been many. I hope to participate on future research opportunities at my facility. I learned how to write and submit an abstract for presentation. This simple act, coupled with my residency experience, has sparked an interest in completing a research project and thesis for my Master’s Degree in Nursing program. I would not have considered this task before completing the research residency.

2004 Nursing Research Residents

Lisa Tze-Polo, Nursing Research Resident

Lisa Tze-Polo, Nursing Research Resident

Lisa Tze-Polo, Nursing Research Resident

My name is Lisa Tze-Polo, Nursing Research Resident, and I have been a staff nurse for 3 years on a medical-surgical unit at Kaiser Woodland Hills Medical Center. It has been my privilege to be able to participate in an innovative pilot program that introduces the staff nurse to nursing research. This nursing research residency program allowed me to work collaboratively with our nursing leaders in research and actively get involved with ongoing nursing research projects in Southern California region. This experience has helped to enhance my interpersonal and organizational skills, which were essential to attaining success in coordinating the research projects. In addition, the exposure to the concepts of research and taking those skills back to the clinical setting has altered my perception of how we perform nursing practice. Nursing is evolving into a more science -based discipline and research is fundamental in this process.

For more information, please download the Nursing Research Residency brochure or contact Anna Omery.

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